Autism

I came across the picture below on the NAS community forum.

I am a cat ... not a defective dog. I like being a cat. AUTISM, it's a difference, not a disease.

 

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Those Who Wish

I wrote the poem below because of my sensitivity to noise and society’s seeming need for ever greater amounts of noise.  Simple acts like using edging shears instead of a strimmer (particularly a petrol powered strimmer) can make a difference to a neighbourhood’s noise levels.

Those Who Wish

Why do some people believe
They have a right
To inflict their noise
On those who wish to read?

Why do some people believe
They have a right
To inflict their noise
On those who wish to write?

Why do some people believe
They have a right
To inflict their noise
On those who wish to think?

Why do some people believe
They have a right
To inflict their noise
On those who wish to wonder?

Why do some people believe
They have a right
To inflict their noise
On those who wish for quiet?

Those who wish to read,
Those who wish to write,
Those who wish to think,
Those who wish to wonder,
Those who wish for quiet;
Where are their rights?

10 Minutes

I wrote the short piece below to try to help neurotypical people understand how their use of words can be unhelpful to those of us with Asperger’s syndrome.


From the moment we learn to tell the time, we know 60 seconds are equal to one minute and 60 minutes are equal to one hour. Further, we know that if one minute has passed, it is always 60 seconds which have passed and this holds true regardless of the day or, indeed, the time of day.

Given we know time works in this way, it follows we should know the meaning of the phrase ‘I [or we] will be 10 minutes.’

Yet each occasion I hear the phrase, I am unpleasantly surprised I have to wait for a period of time which is not 10 minutes.

The use of a phrase which includes a period of time to mean anything but the specified time is curious, imprecise, unsettling, and more.

The Way We Are: Autism in 2012

To mark its 50th birthday, the National Autistic Society commissioned the largest ever survey into autism with a view to showing what life is like in the UK for people affected by the condition.

The report was published earlier this month and can be downloaded via:
http://www.autism.org.uk/50report

(Throughout the report, unless otherwise specified, where reference is made to autism, this covers the entire autism spectrum, including Asperger’s syndrome, high functioning autism, and Kanner autism.)