First-ever Photos of a Wild Lion Nursing a Leopard Cub

Below is one the photos published on the Mongabay website.

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First Evidence of Snow Leopards in Saylyugem National Park in Russia

Please visit the Saving Snow Leopards Report site for details.

First ever seen snow leopard in new National park in Russia. Photo by Saylyugem National Park.

First ever seen snow leopard in new National park in Russia. Photo by Saylyugem National Park.

Animal Protection: Special Projects

I recently received a link to a website, Animal Protection: Special Projects, which was new to me.  The current programmes, each of which has a project site, cover: Amur leopards, Amur tigers, polar bears, snow leopards, and white whales.

The mass media should be covering such work.

The programme to research the Amur tiger in Russia’s Far East is an independent project which is carried out as part of the research being done by the expedition of the Russian Academy of Sciences on animals that have been placed on the Russian Federation’s Red List of Threatened Species and other particularly important species of animals in Russia.

The programme to research the Amur tiger in Russia’s Far East is an independent project which is carried out as part of the research being done by the expedition of the Russian Academy of Sciences on animals that have been placed on the Russian Federation’s Red List of Threatened Species and other particularly important species of animals in Russia.

Afghanistan’s Second National Park

The Afghan government has declared the entire Wakhan district – bordered by Pakistan to the south, China to the east, and Tajikistan to the north – in the remote northeast as the country’s second national park.

The Afghan government worked with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in collaboration with local groups to forge partnerships resulting in the national park.

Like Afghanistan’s first national park, Band-e Amir, the Wakhan National Park will help protect the country’s remaining endangered snow leopards.

For the full story, please visit the Saving Snow Leopards blog site.

There is a Snow Leopard on my Roof

The snow leopard cub in the amazing images below was attracted by a bag of meat a family had stored on the roof of their ger. The heat rising from the ger offered warmth where the cub could fall asleep following his meal!  Please visit the Saving Snow Leopards blog site for the full (and happy) story.

A young snow leopard cub happy on a warm roof of a ger. Photo by Mongolian herder D. Ganbat and family with their cell phone.

A young snow leopard cub happy on a warm roof of a ger. Photo by Mongolian herder D. Ganbat and family with their mobile phone.

The snow leopard cub snug on the roof of the ger. Images taken with cell phones by D. Ganbat and family.

The snow leopard cub snug on the roof of the ger. Image taken with a mobile phone by D. Ganbat and family.

Leopards in the Soutpansberg Mountains

According to a recent study, the Soutpansberg Mountains in north-east South Africa are home to the densest leopard population outside a state protected area anywhere in Africa, with, on average, nearly 11 leopards per 100 square kilometres.  By comparison, there are just one to three leopards over the same area in the Cederberg and Waterberg Mountains.

Young female leopard.

Young female leopard.

Only state protected national parks, such as the Kruger National Park and Gabon’s Ivindo National Park support a greater density of leopards: the Sabie river area of the southern Kruger supports just over 30 of the animals per 100 square kilometres whilst the Ivindo supports 12.

The researchers believe one of the reasons the leopards have successfully made the Soutpansberg Mountains their home is because it supports one of their favourite prey, the bushbuck.

The study’s lead author, Dr Julia Chase Grey, said, “We now need long-term data on leopard densities over a larger area in the western Soutpansberg to confirm the conservation importance of the area.”

If the results are confirmed and the population persists, the area may, one day, become a recognised conservation area.

For the full story, please visit the Planet Earth Online web site.